Neil Young and his wife, actress Daryl Hannah, have released a newly produced live clip of Young performing his 1970 Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young classic “Ohio” in deference to recent massacre victims and in support of tougher, “common sense” gun laws.

The video, which features Young in concert playing his legendary Gretsch White Falcon electric guitar, intersperses images and sounds from the May 4th, 1970 Kent State University attacks where four students killed by National Guardsmen during anti-war protests on the Ohio campus.

Neil Young posted the following a message to fans on his official website NeilYoungArchives.com:

OHIO AGAIN

Ohio was written back in 1970 after seeing the cover of a magazine with a young girl kneeling beside her fallen friend. When the National Guard murdered four students at Ohio's Kent State University for protesting the Vietnam War, it was a pivotal moment in our history. It was a pivotal movement for me.

Today we see what we have become.

With no real laws protecting us from guns, and with politicians supporting the NRA because the NRA supports them, we are not well represented. Today’s students are brave, demanding change in violent times.

We stand with them. They are us. We are them. This has been going on for too long. My wife Daryl and I put this video together for you to reflect on. Support the students. Support our children. They want protection. No more guns. Give us common sense gun laws that protect our people, in schools, in places of worship, thev workplace and on the streets. VOTE.

PEACE NYA

David Crosby recalled to us a trip with CSNY in recent years to the university's campus in memorial to the students: “We went back to Kent State not long ago, to the site where those Guardsmen murdered those four kids. And the looks on faces of parents and people there (and) students who were there when it happened, parents and kids that it happened to — when we stood there and sang 'Ohio'. . . I got a great job. I got a great thing to do in life, and if I have to do it in public, then I have to do it in public.”

Source: Pulse of Radio